PROGRAMME/Courses overview

China's Urbanization

China's Urbanization and Evolving Urbanisms

Investigating Shanghai's Diversities and Transformation


This course is available:        

CCSP Summer Sessions 2018 (course starts: July 9, 2018, course ends July 20, 2018)

 

Course leaders:                     

Assc. Prof. dr. Leo van Grunsven (Utrecht University).

                  

Credits:                           

4 ECTS

 

Course fees Summer Sessions:    

13.200 CNY

 

More information:                

studyinchina@edvance-international.com

 

Apply now:

https://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/courses/social-sciences/china_s_urbanization_and_evolving_urbanisms

 

Course description

This course delves into urbanization and the dynamic metropolitan transformation in the Chinese context. Since a few decades, China’s geography and ‘face’ is being transformed at an unprecedented rate by urbanization and urban development, whereby its society is rapidly transitioning into an urban one. The ramifications for diverse groups in Chinese society are wide-ranging. Increasingly, the cities are the places where economic and social development in China under reform and globalization, changes in politics, governance, and culture are being played out. At the same time, Chinese urbanization and city development is occurring under circumstances that – economically, institutionally, socially and culturally – diverges significantly from the ‘Western’ context. As a result, city expansion, intra-urban restructuring, the transformation of cityscapes and the reshaping of the lives of city dwellers have distinct characteristics. Significantly, the economic, environmental, and human costs of recent relentless change are currently engendering a reorientation of urban policy and planning towards ‘Sustainable and Resilient Cities’.

 

The aims of the course are first to elucidate urbanization, urban transformation ‘with Chinese characteristics’, and current-day Chinese urban life. Second, to debate the fascinating comparative perspective vis-à-vis highly urbanized western societies. It challenges participants to confront current metropolitan development and transformation occurring in the distinct Chinese institutional environment with ideas and principles of urban development and urbanisms pertaining to the own home context. Third, to illustrate sustainable development in Chinese fashion. No doubt, the Shanghai Metropolis epitomizes many of the processes and features elucidated above. A fourth aim of the course then is to scrutinize this specific metropolis.

 

Focus on Shanghai and Yangtze River Delta region

Over the past decades, Shanghai has developed into China’s prime metropolitan area, located in coastal East China, in the Yangtze River delta. While its rich history is still visible in the ‘downtown’ area, recent rapid expansion and transformation reflects its role as prime engine of China’s post-reform transition and modernization. Today, Shanghai is a global city from a business perspective, a center of management and innovation to the domestic economy, the place of residence for over 20 million Chinese citizens, a significant part of whom have migrated from elsewhere in China. Shanghai is a microcosm of urban transition and social transformation in contemporary China, evident in its diverse and dynamic ‘cityscapes’, ranging from the disappearing (and some renovated) central ‘Shikumen’ areas, Pudong New Area to the New Towns in suburban districts. Shanghai is the core of a ‘network megalopolis’ in the Yangtze River Delta. Few other mega-urban regions in the world match its demographic and economic power.

 

Examination & Grading

The course grade is based on three different components.

1.         Field visit assignments, small teams (25%)

2.         Theme report plus presentation: students compile a brief illustrated report (max. 2.500 words) in groups in which they analyze a specific theme on urban transformation in China and its manifestation in Shanghai. Using secondary materials and information obtained through field observation, conclusions are drawn in relation to a relevant conceptual framework (40% of the final grade)

3.         Individual essay (max. 2,000 words) in which the student reflects on the dynamics of the Chinese City (as discussed in the course book), Shanghai in comparison with the home context (35% of the final grade)

 

Student profile/target group

Students of the social sciences, including economics and business, political sciences, European studies, history, culture studies and sociology. A wide range of interests will help, but no specific expertise is required.

 

Reading

Wu, Weiping and Gaubatz, Piper (2013), The Chinese City (selected chapters) London/New York: Routledge; ISBN: 978-0-415-57575-1 (pbk), 978-0-20385447-1 (ebk); selected readings on Shanghai (to be listed in the course schedule)

 

Course structure

The course has two major components. The first one concerns learning about the nature and context of recent Chinese urbanization and urban development, institutional arrangements, organizations, jurisdictions, and concrete urban policies. The second one concerns the study of Shanghai as exemplar of Chinese urban transition, by looking at its growth and features of urban transformation during successive historical periods, with a focus on post-reform restructuring and expansion.

 

The course is designed as a full-credit 4-ects course. Ten days are scheduled whereby the mornings are spent on general lectures, class discussion of readings, and preparation of local field visits. In many afternoons field activities are scheduled. Observation of several distinct – functional – parts of the city, and interpretation of observed features (involving comparison with other data sources) provide significant insights into the diversity of urbanisms and transformation in the Shanghai metropolitan area. Following desk research carried out with the use of published sources, there will be organized group field visits to specific sites in the city, interactive sessions and field visits guided by local experts, as well as field observation assignments. Small teams of students zoom in on selected themes and areas/neighbourhoods. In addition, each student selects a specific issue (referring to urban policy and planning related to inter alia economic, social, built environment, infrastructure, environmental problems) to be elaborated in a brief essay.

In the weekend between the first and the second week of the course a day-trip to another city in the delta may be planned.

 

Application deadline

1 June 2018

 

Apply now:

https://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/courses/social-sciences/china_s_urbanization_and_evolving_urbanisms

 

Resume Course Director / Lecturers

Dr. Leo van Grunsven is Associate Professor of Economic and Urban Geography in the Department of Human Geography and Planning, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University. His teaching and research focuses on regional-economic and urban development patterns and issues in the Southeast and East Asian region where he has worked his entire academic career. He is active in China for more than 10 years. Besides course teaching he also organizes field courses/trips for advanced undergraduate and master students to Shanghai, Singapore and Malaysia, in collaboration with local academic institutions. He is a senior visiting fellow at Penang Institute and associated with Think City in Penang, Malaysia. He has taught urban development and planning courses at Nanjing University, Nanjing. Through annual China study tours for University of the Third Age he has by now travelled most parts of China.

 


Course schedule

 

Monday, July 9, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-12.00

Session 1: Lecture:   China’s urbanization and urban development: overview


13.30-17.00

Session 2:   Lecture + discussion readings

A   historical perspective on China’s urban development and city change

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapter 2

 

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-10.30

Session 3: Lecture: The development of Shanghai from 19th   to the 21st century

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapter 3

10.30-12.30

Desk research Walks Old and Republican Shanghai (international   settlements)


14.00-16.00

Visit old city of Shanghai

Field   assignment

16.00-17.30

Visit French Concession, Jing’An Villa


 

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-12.00

Session 4: Lecture + seminar: Urban development and transformation   with Chinese Characteristics: institutional features; outcomes

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapter 8, Ying Zhou 2017 chapter 1

13.30-17.00

Shanghai Inner City redevelopment and restructuring; gentrification:   field visit and assignment French Concession Wukang Lu

Field   assignment

 

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-10.30

Session 5: seminar social dynamics, housing diversities, urban   residence and living

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapter 10

10.30-12.00

Desk research urban residential diversities Shanghai


13.00-15.00

Field visit Socialist housing; Gubei gated community

Field assignment

15.00-18.00

Field visit New Town: James Town or Gaoqiao NT

Field assignment

 

Friday, July 13, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-11.00

Session 6: seminar The Chinese city and rural-urban migration

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapter 5

11.00-14.00

Group theme project: elaboration research plan

In class   consultation available

15.00-17.00

Field visit migrant neighbourhood

Field   assignment

Evening

Group dinner & leisure



Visit Xintiandi


 

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

Morning/

Afternoon

Visit traditional wet markets

Group theme project: field work

T.b.a.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

Morning/

Afternoon

Own time


 

Monday, July 16,   2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-11.00

Session 7: Lecture + seminar Chinese Cities: globalizing cities, life   style change and consumer cities

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz chapters 6 & 12

11.30-12.30

Desk research Shanghai global & consumption city


13.30-18.00

Visit Pudong Lujiazui district, Shanghai Tower; visit Tianzifang

Field   assignment

 

Tuesday, July 17,   2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-11.00

Session 8: Lecture + seminar Chinese urban regeneration for new   economy, innovation & creativity

Readings:

T.b.a.

11.30-13.00

Field visit: Creative District M50 Moganshan Road;


14.00-16.00

Field visit Expo 2010 site


16.00 - ……

Group theme project: field work


                                                                                                                    

Wednesday, July 18,   2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-12.00

Session 9: Lecture + seminar Chinese urban liveability, sustainability   and resilience; issues and approaches; cases: contemporary & future   mobilities; management of public space

Readings:

Wu/Gaubatz,   chapters 9 and 11, 12

13.00-15.00

Visit Shanghai Urban Planning Exhibition Hall

Assignment

15.00-18.00

Group theme project: field work


 

Thursday, July 19, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-12.00

Completion group theme assignment: field observations

Field   activity

13.00-17.00

Compiling group report

In-class   consultation available

 

Friday, July 20, 2018

Time

Programme

Comments

09.00-14.30

Consultation individual essay; writing, completion individual essay


15.00-17.00

Presentations group theme projects


19.00-21.00

Farewell dinner   & graduation ceremony

Venue: